The movie begins only halfway through the book, skipping over the fact that the women chose to get married and have families before continuing their educations (insert cringe), worked for NACA – before it became NASA – for many years, and excluding several of their scientific contributions in aeronautics in order to focus on one specific success. The characters of the movie have relationships – with men and with each other – that have ups and downs. What I love about the book is, unsurprisingly, the science. . Both of these works have something unique to say to their audience: The movie certainly makes things more relatable and easy to follow as a story, whereas the book presents a lot more facts and context that would be useful in a classroom setting, where in-depth conversations can be had about all the information presented. The rest of the world watched America, losing the space race and holding on to ideals that alienated more than 50 percent of the population, with cynicism. I had thought, while reading, that much of the background information was common knowledge or just plain boring, but as I talked to Jeriann about the book, I realized that I had gleaned information about the lives of Black Americans from the end of WWII to the 1980s, including difficulties finding housing and jobs because of racist federal laws that persisted even after Brown vs Board of Education and other civil suits made segregation and discrimination based on race illegal. There was character interaction, dialogue, and world-building that was demonstrated through the characters themselves. My favorites of this genre include Interstellar and The Shape of Water. Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. Reading Accoutrements: Coffee! Books like this are so important because they bring to light the work of important people that would otherwise be lost to history – and they make you wonder what would have happened if the world hadn’t trapped those people on specific paths. I too write about books and movies. Melfi is very clear that this movie and the scenes in it are 100 percent true and based on true events as written in Margot Lee Shetterly’s. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. I love that the women in the movie have real emotions and real feelings that are so obviously, painfully absent in the book. I know from reading the epilogue of the book that Dorothy Vaughan never learned how to drive, yet many of the scenes – including the first scene showing the primary characters as adults – show Dorothy Vaughan, played by Octavia Butler, driving a car. (the book). ( Log Out /  It’s exactly how i feel about the movie vs the book. I’m proud to say that I finally got through the whole thing (including the epilogue) and I have a few ideas about why this book was hard for me. Content Notes: Both the book and movie explore racism, anti-feminism, and segregation in America over the span of several decades. Learn how your comment data is processed. The film had moments of humor, moments of sadness, and moments of true triumph and inspiration. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Instead, in the book, the signs didn’t exist in the far-flung parts of campus that the women worked in, so they assumed the bathrooms were integrated. You know what? Hidden Figures Introduction + Context. Be the first to ask a question about Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures.
The biographical text follows the lives of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and …

The movie is subtle, but it makes you feel the impact of racism daily. A LOT. n a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a 2016 nonfiction book written by Margot Lee Shetterly. The Teacher-Author has indicated that this resource is made for device-based learning. ( Log Out /  I’m glad I stuck with reading the book – even though it was hard – and I’m glad that I watched the movie because it led me to the book and more knowledge and understanding of the events that took place before America made it into space. The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity.

(I’ll also add that this book spans almost the full lifetimes of these women, and they got married – some more than once – and their names changed, making it more difficult to follow.
I learned a lot of really cool information about the history and physics of plane development; the difference between subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic travel; the math necessary to solve man’s quest to fly; and so on. Another challenge that historical non-fiction authors face is the question of how to organize the information. ( Log Out /  Shetterly did collaborate on the movie, so it’s possible that they took the exciting scenes from her research that were left out of the book and used them…but I would suggest keeping in mind that Hollywood took liberties with the scenes and interactions while you watch the movie.

While the movie has dashes of the insidious racism that was prevalent during the time, the book hammers the constant awareness that black people had of the precarious situation they lived in. Theodor Geisel said... To see what your friends thought of this book, Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race: Based on the Book by Margot Lee Shetterly. She put the focus on the hidden figures – and I understand her reasoning – but I would have appreciated that organization a lot more. The movie follows the story of three women involved in the race to propel humankind into space… The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity. One point of the book that is completely absent in the movie is the fact that America was. For example, Katherine Coleman became Katherine Goble and then became Katherine G. Johnson, or Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson.). Politicians in the U.S., fighting the perceived tide of communism, were adamant that integration was communist and would ruin the very fabric of America. But I love the actresses in Hidden Figures and the story looked awesome and I didn’t have time to read the book yet. Refresh and try again. surprised with the amount of general history I learned while reading this book. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Included is a summary of each chapter, a timeline, a biography of the author and a list of the key characters. I’m not sure why this made the final cut.

Included in this download are 3 1-page biography readings on the 3 women, a page on cut-out "pop up" figures of the women, a timeline activity, and a 2-page worksheet on the readings. Preferred Reading Environment: In a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. December 27th 2016 …and then Melfi admits to mashing three real people into one for Kevin Costner’s character (because they didn’t have the life rights to the actual head of NASA at the time). Do you have a favorite book-to-movie conversion?

When I am reading for pleasure, I absolutely prefer to read a book that draws me in, takes me on a dramatic – but light-hearted – adventure, and leaves me smiling. Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered). Shetterly chose to present the information in a linear fashion, backtracking occasionally to provide historical background.
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The movie begins only halfway through the book, skipping over the fact that the women chose to get married and have families before continuing their educations (insert cringe), worked for NACA – before it became NASA – for many years, and excluding several of their scientific contributions in aeronautics in order to focus on one specific success. The characters of the movie have relationships – with men and with each other – that have ups and downs. What I love about the book is, unsurprisingly, the science. . Both of these works have something unique to say to their audience: The movie certainly makes things more relatable and easy to follow as a story, whereas the book presents a lot more facts and context that would be useful in a classroom setting, where in-depth conversations can be had about all the information presented. The rest of the world watched America, losing the space race and holding on to ideals that alienated more than 50 percent of the population, with cynicism. I had thought, while reading, that much of the background information was common knowledge or just plain boring, but as I talked to Jeriann about the book, I realized that I had gleaned information about the lives of Black Americans from the end of WWII to the 1980s, including difficulties finding housing and jobs because of racist federal laws that persisted even after Brown vs Board of Education and other civil suits made segregation and discrimination based on race illegal. There was character interaction, dialogue, and world-building that was demonstrated through the characters themselves. My favorites of this genre include Interstellar and The Shape of Water. Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. Reading Accoutrements: Coffee! Books like this are so important because they bring to light the work of important people that would otherwise be lost to history – and they make you wonder what would have happened if the world hadn’t trapped those people on specific paths. I too write about books and movies. Melfi is very clear that this movie and the scenes in it are 100 percent true and based on true events as written in Margot Lee Shetterly’s. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. I love that the women in the movie have real emotions and real feelings that are so obviously, painfully absent in the book. I know from reading the epilogue of the book that Dorothy Vaughan never learned how to drive, yet many of the scenes – including the first scene showing the primary characters as adults – show Dorothy Vaughan, played by Octavia Butler, driving a car. (the book). ( Log Out /  It’s exactly how i feel about the movie vs the book. I’m proud to say that I finally got through the whole thing (including the epilogue) and I have a few ideas about why this book was hard for me. Content Notes: Both the book and movie explore racism, anti-feminism, and segregation in America over the span of several decades. Learn how your comment data is processed. The film had moments of humor, moments of sadness, and moments of true triumph and inspiration. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Instead, in the book, the signs didn’t exist in the far-flung parts of campus that the women worked in, so they assumed the bathrooms were integrated. You know what? Hidden Figures Introduction + Context. Be the first to ask a question about Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures.
The biographical text follows the lives of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and …

The movie is subtle, but it makes you feel the impact of racism daily. A LOT. n a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a 2016 nonfiction book written by Margot Lee Shetterly. The Teacher-Author has indicated that this resource is made for device-based learning. ( Log Out /  I’m glad I stuck with reading the book – even though it was hard – and I’m glad that I watched the movie because it led me to the book and more knowledge and understanding of the events that took place before America made it into space. The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity.

(I’ll also add that this book spans almost the full lifetimes of these women, and they got married – some more than once – and their names changed, making it more difficult to follow.
I learned a lot of really cool information about the history and physics of plane development; the difference between subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic travel; the math necessary to solve man’s quest to fly; and so on. Another challenge that historical non-fiction authors face is the question of how to organize the information. ( Log Out /  Shetterly did collaborate on the movie, so it’s possible that they took the exciting scenes from her research that were left out of the book and used them…but I would suggest keeping in mind that Hollywood took liberties with the scenes and interactions while you watch the movie.

While the movie has dashes of the insidious racism that was prevalent during the time, the book hammers the constant awareness that black people had of the precarious situation they lived in. Theodor Geisel said... To see what your friends thought of this book, Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race: Based on the Book by Margot Lee Shetterly. She put the focus on the hidden figures – and I understand her reasoning – but I would have appreciated that organization a lot more. The movie follows the story of three women involved in the race to propel humankind into space… The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity. One point of the book that is completely absent in the movie is the fact that America was. For example, Katherine Coleman became Katherine Goble and then became Katherine G. Johnson, or Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson.). Politicians in the U.S., fighting the perceived tide of communism, were adamant that integration was communist and would ruin the very fabric of America. But I love the actresses in Hidden Figures and the story looked awesome and I didn’t have time to read the book yet. Refresh and try again. surprised with the amount of general history I learned while reading this book. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Included is a summary of each chapter, a timeline, a biography of the author and a list of the key characters. I’m not sure why this made the final cut.

Included in this download are 3 1-page biography readings on the 3 women, a page on cut-out "pop up" figures of the women, a timeline activity, and a 2-page worksheet on the readings. Preferred Reading Environment: In a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. December 27th 2016 …and then Melfi admits to mashing three real people into one for Kevin Costner’s character (because they didn’t have the life rights to the actual head of NASA at the time). Do you have a favorite book-to-movie conversion?

When I am reading for pleasure, I absolutely prefer to read a book that draws me in, takes me on a dramatic – but light-hearted – adventure, and leaves me smiling. Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered). Shetterly chose to present the information in a linear fashion, backtracking occasionally to provide historical background.
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hidden figures book timeline


and the story looked awesome and I didn’t have time to read the book yet. Change ). , by Margot Lee Shetterly, follows the journey of four black women who, like the title says, were mathematicians who made significant contributions to the American space program. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. I know from reading the epilogue of the book that Dorothy Vaughan never learned how to drive, yet many of the scenes – including the first scene showing the primary characters as adults – show Dorothy Vaughan, played by Octavia Butler, driving a car.

Remember how I said I kept confusing the women in the book? Hidden Figures Introduction + Context . The most characterization a person might get is that she was “of an unusually independent mind,” or she “had a strong analytical bent,” or maybe she had “strength of character.” Generic descriptions that had me confusing one woman for another for much of the book. However, it's a good resource for anyone leading a discussion on the book.

World-building without characterization is a major problem I have with historical non-fiction, and it is a huge part of. I also love that the title isn’t immediately obvious – it could mean that these women are hidden historical figures, yes, but Shetterly wrote in the epilogue that Mary Jackson and her colleagues in Human Resources at NASA had to learn to reprogram the computers to mine data about hiring practices at the organization. But I love the actresses in. Check them out if you like. Check out my blog too. I was looking forward to following her as she interviewed the living computers and dug out the information, but that wasn’t how the rest of the book was written. One might even say that the movie is an addendum to the book. Plot Summary. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Btw… really enjoyed reading your post!

The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”  Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, (2016), starring Taraji P. Hensen, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monáe. “Excuses, excuses…”) SO, I watched the movie first. They used those “hidden figures” (squeals in delight at the double meaning) to make a case to NASA administration that more women and minorities should be hired, and why certain policies were preventing NASA hiring practices from improving. The government pushed NASA and its staff very hard to get to space first, and Russia succeeded in getting the first satellite, the first dog, and the first man in space.

Please "Like" my page on Facebook for updates, giveaways, links and more! The book's film adaptation, starring Octavia Spencer and Taraji P. Henson, is … It didn’t help that each of the women were noticeably intelligent and successful in their schooling, then all chose to detour away from their own careers and education for the sake of a man (Katherine Coleman and Dorothy Vaughan got married, Mary Jackson came home to take care of her sick father, etc.). ( Log Out /  “The more that you read, the more things you will know.

The movie begins only halfway through the book, skipping over the fact that the women chose to get married and have families before continuing their educations (insert cringe), worked for NACA – before it became NASA – for many years, and excluding several of their scientific contributions in aeronautics in order to focus on one specific success. The characters of the movie have relationships – with men and with each other – that have ups and downs. What I love about the book is, unsurprisingly, the science. . Both of these works have something unique to say to their audience: The movie certainly makes things more relatable and easy to follow as a story, whereas the book presents a lot more facts and context that would be useful in a classroom setting, where in-depth conversations can be had about all the information presented. The rest of the world watched America, losing the space race and holding on to ideals that alienated more than 50 percent of the population, with cynicism. I had thought, while reading, that much of the background information was common knowledge or just plain boring, but as I talked to Jeriann about the book, I realized that I had gleaned information about the lives of Black Americans from the end of WWII to the 1980s, including difficulties finding housing and jobs because of racist federal laws that persisted even after Brown vs Board of Education and other civil suits made segregation and discrimination based on race illegal. There was character interaction, dialogue, and world-building that was demonstrated through the characters themselves. My favorites of this genre include Interstellar and The Shape of Water. Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. Reading Accoutrements: Coffee! Books like this are so important because they bring to light the work of important people that would otherwise be lost to history – and they make you wonder what would have happened if the world hadn’t trapped those people on specific paths. I too write about books and movies. Melfi is very clear that this movie and the scenes in it are 100 percent true and based on true events as written in Margot Lee Shetterly’s. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. I love that the women in the movie have real emotions and real feelings that are so obviously, painfully absent in the book. I know from reading the epilogue of the book that Dorothy Vaughan never learned how to drive, yet many of the scenes – including the first scene showing the primary characters as adults – show Dorothy Vaughan, played by Octavia Butler, driving a car. (the book). ( Log Out /  It’s exactly how i feel about the movie vs the book. I’m proud to say that I finally got through the whole thing (including the epilogue) and I have a few ideas about why this book was hard for me. Content Notes: Both the book and movie explore racism, anti-feminism, and segregation in America over the span of several decades. Learn how your comment data is processed. The film had moments of humor, moments of sadness, and moments of true triumph and inspiration. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Instead, in the book, the signs didn’t exist in the far-flung parts of campus that the women worked in, so they assumed the bathrooms were integrated. You know what? Hidden Figures Introduction + Context. Be the first to ask a question about Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures.
The biographical text follows the lives of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and …

The movie is subtle, but it makes you feel the impact of racism daily. A LOT. n a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a 2016 nonfiction book written by Margot Lee Shetterly. The Teacher-Author has indicated that this resource is made for device-based learning. ( Log Out /  I’m glad I stuck with reading the book – even though it was hard – and I’m glad that I watched the movie because it led me to the book and more knowledge and understanding of the events that took place before America made it into space. The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity.

(I’ll also add that this book spans almost the full lifetimes of these women, and they got married – some more than once – and their names changed, making it more difficult to follow.
I learned a lot of really cool information about the history and physics of plane development; the difference between subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic travel; the math necessary to solve man’s quest to fly; and so on. Another challenge that historical non-fiction authors face is the question of how to organize the information. ( Log Out /  Shetterly did collaborate on the movie, so it’s possible that they took the exciting scenes from her research that were left out of the book and used them…but I would suggest keeping in mind that Hollywood took liberties with the scenes and interactions while you watch the movie.

While the movie has dashes of the insidious racism that was prevalent during the time, the book hammers the constant awareness that black people had of the precarious situation they lived in. Theodor Geisel said... To see what your friends thought of this book, Summary and Analysis of Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race: Based on the Book by Margot Lee Shetterly. She put the focus on the hidden figures – and I understand her reasoning – but I would have appreciated that organization a lot more. The movie follows the story of three women involved in the race to propel humankind into space… The reader rarely sees actual interaction between players – there will be no dialogue unless there is a transcript to back it up, no description of twinkling eyes or cheeks flushing with anger without first-hand accounts or video evidence to prove its veracity. One point of the book that is completely absent in the movie is the fact that America was. For example, Katherine Coleman became Katherine Goble and then became Katherine G. Johnson, or Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson.). Politicians in the U.S., fighting the perceived tide of communism, were adamant that integration was communist and would ruin the very fabric of America. But I love the actresses in Hidden Figures and the story looked awesome and I didn’t have time to read the book yet. Refresh and try again. surprised with the amount of general history I learned while reading this book. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Included is a summary of each chapter, a timeline, a biography of the author and a list of the key characters. I’m not sure why this made the final cut.

Included in this download are 3 1-page biography readings on the 3 women, a page on cut-out "pop up" figures of the women, a timeline activity, and a 2-page worksheet on the readings. Preferred Reading Environment: In a quiet bath where you can focus on dense material. December 27th 2016 …and then Melfi admits to mashing three real people into one for Kevin Costner’s character (because they didn’t have the life rights to the actual head of NASA at the time). Do you have a favorite book-to-movie conversion?

When I am reading for pleasure, I absolutely prefer to read a book that draws me in, takes me on a dramatic – but light-hearted – adventure, and leaves me smiling. Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered). Shetterly chose to present the information in a linear fashion, backtracking occasionally to provide historical background.

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